US Third at the World Fly Fishing Championship

img_1282US Flyfishing team receiving the Bronze Medal and 3rd place trophy

EAGLE COUNTY — Spain defended its fly-fishing crown at the 36th annual FIPS-Mouche World Fly Fishing Championship on Saturday, with France taking second and the U.S. finishing third.

In the individual standings, Americans Lance Egan and Pat Weiss took third and fourth, respectively, with Julien Daguillanes, of France, winning and Jordi Cortina, of Spain, taking second. The Americans had four finishers in the top 15, an unprecedented achievement for the team that finished last at the World Fly Fishing Championship in 1997 and has been steadily improving since then.

Egan said he was able to finish well by fishing making the most of the bad beats he was dealt. The athletes randomly draw what beat — or section of the river — they will receive in competition.

“I drew a beat that produced the least amount of fish and managed to catch more fish than all other competitors combined,” Egan said.”I drew two good beats and two dreadful beats.” Egan also won the Slyvan Lake portion of the competition at the State Park in Eagle.

3,802 FISH CAUGHT, RELEASED

Other venues included the Eagle and Colorado rivers in Eagle County and the Blue River in Summit County.

Egan caught 60 fish over the course of the three-day competition; Cortina caught 70 and Daguillanes caught 86 trout. Those fish were then measured for length and each competitor received a point total based on number of fish caught and the length of those fish. Daguillanes biggest fish was a whopping 32-inch trout caught in water surrounded by privately owned banks on the Eagle River.

img_1288aWining teams at the 36th annual FIPS-Mouche World Fly Fishing Championship.  L-R France (Silver medal), Spain (Gold Medal), USA (Bronze medal).

From John LaConte at the the Vail Daily.  For more see http://www.vaildaily.com/news/23950205-113/americans-hit-podium-at-world-championship

 

Parasitic Disease Causes Yellowstone River Closure

SBB_0831-558x372In response to a parasitic disease that caused an unprecedented fish kill, on August 19, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) closed 183 miles of the Yellowstone River and all its tributaries.

The closure stretches from Yellowstone National Park’s North Boundary to Laurel, Montana. “This action is necessary to protect the fishery and the economy it sustain,” said Montana FWP in a press release. “The closure will also help limit the spread of the parasite to adjacent rivers through boats, tubes, waders and other human contact and minimize further mortality in all fish species.

“In the past week, FWP has documented over 2,000 dead Mountain Whitefish on some affected stretches of the Yellowstone. With that, FWP estimates the total impact to Mountain Whitefish in the Yellowstone to be in the tens of thousands. FWP has also recently received reports of the kill beginning to affect some Rainbow and Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout.”

http://coloradotu.org/2016/08/yellowstone-river-closure/

Efforts to Restore Yellowstone Lake Cutthroat Proving Successful

Yellowstone CutEfforts in Yellowstone Lake to reduce the number of non-native lake trout and subsequently bolster cutthroat trout populations are succeeding. According to the Cody Enterprise, the ratio between the trout species is nearing 50–50, an improvement from what was previously a 90–10 domination by the predatory lake trout. Dave Sweet, a Trout Unlimited member and Yellowstone Lake special project manager, has spent the past eight and a half years working to improve cutthroat populations. He said the new findings are encouraging but also noted that there is still much to be done in reviving the native cutthroats.

Lake trout are a unique threat to Yellowstone cutthroat, which are a key food source for roughly 20 area wildlife species, including bears and ospreys, and they support sport fishing, which brings in $36 million annually, to boot. Because of the fish’s widespread effect on the ecosystem, Sweet said restoring the cutthroat is vitally important. “It’s called a keystone species in Yellowstone,” Sweet told the Cody Enterprise. “It really ripples through the ecosystem.”

According to the National Park Service, cutthroat trout represent about 80 percent of a lake trout’s diet; biologists estimate that mature lake trout eat about 41 cutthroats a year. Since the first Yellowstone lake trout was discovered in 1994, 1.7 million have been removed via gillnetting. Anglers remove another 20,000 each year. One goal of Yellowstone’s Native Fish Conservation Plan, instituted in 2011, is to eliminate 25 percent of the lake trout population a year until their numbers become insignificant.

From Field and Stream

Boulder Creek Community Dinner

May 20 @ 6:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Boulder Creek Restoration – Flatirons Park Project

We need your help to raise the $85,000 needed for The Flatirons Park project. This 2016/2017 project will improve habitat and stream flow in Boulder Creek from Foothills Parkway downstream for about 3/4 mile.

Bldr Creek project 2016

This project will:

  • Establish a stream channel shape in balance with the current flow
  • Construct natural instream features that provide for the habitat needs of native and sport fish:
    • Timber and cobble habitat
    • Excavating small pools
    • Creating an over-winter low flow channel
    • Protect existing vegetation from further erosion
  • Plant native riparian vegetation to stabilize banks and provide shade and overhead cover
Boulder Flycasters has:

  • A proven record of success on stream restoration projects including Rogers Park on Boulder creek and several stretchs on South Boulder creek
  • Experience working collaboratively with various agencies, government entities and other non-profits
  • Success organizing large groups of volunteers for ‘in-kind’ work
  • Long-term dedication to local community

Support the fundraising effort by attending the
Boulder Creek Restoration Community Dinner!

Friday May 20th – Doors open at 6 PM
Odd Fellows Lodge – 1543 Pearl St. Boulder CO 80302

$55 per person / $100 per couple
Enjoy drinks and dinner with fellow conservationists
Dinner and Drinks
Silent and Live auctions

Consider becoming a sponsor

Honorable $10,000
includes table for 8 and raffles
Gold $5,000
includes table for 8
Silver $2,500
includes entry for 4
Bronze $1,000
includes entry for 4

Boulder Flycasters Chapter meeting – Fly Fishing the Gunnison Gorge

Wednesday, April 6, 2016, 6:30 PM

Upslope Brewery, 1898 S. Flatiron Court Boulder, CO 80301, Boulder, CO

The Gunnison River in the Black Canyon and Gunnison Gorge is a Gold Medal wild trout fishery that stretches over 40 miles from Crystal Reservoir to the town of Austin and provides many diverse wading and float fishing opportunities.

The Gunnison is renowned for its large Rainbow Trout and a healthy population of Brown Trout.  A float through the steep walled Gunnison Gorge, a National Conservation Area, is one of the top fly fishing trips in the lower 48. Just downstream of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, the Gunnison Gorge features unrivaled scenery and geology. Seeing big horn sheep, mule deer, river otters and eagles will only heighten your appreciation.

Learn about the fishing opportunities from Derek R. Kehmeier with the Black Canyon UntitledAnglers.  Derek is a Colorado Native, and is now an assistant manager and guide with BCA.

Blue River stretch loses Gold Medal status

BlueRiver - Courtesy of PlatteCanyonWaterandSanitationDistrict

The 19 mile Blue River stretch between Silverthorne to Green Mountain Reservoir has been degraded of it’s Gold Medal status by Colorado Parks and Wildlife. The river still has 15 miles of it’s Gold status from the Dillon Dam to Hamilton Creek Road bridge crossing and also from Green Mountain Dam to the waterway’s confluence with the Colorado River.Upper Colorado River

The decision comes after CPW has been monitoring unnatural stream flows, sparse aquatic habitat, and low nutrient content all contributed to the decline of the water. CPW said that stretch of the river hasn’t met the Gold Medal standard for about 15 years.

“The overall goal is to maintain the integrity of the Gold Medal designation,” Jon Ewert, a CPW aquatic biologist, said in a statement. “As necessary, we will make recommendations to delist or upgrade waters, keeping in mind the intent of the designation — identifying waters where anglers can catch large, trophy-quality trout.”

Read more at http://coloradotu.org/2016/03/blue-river-loses-gold-medal-status/

2016 Fly Fishing Film Tour

The Fly Fishing Film Tour (F3T) is a one of a kind experience showcasing the best in fly fishing cinema. 2016 marks The F3T’s 10th lap around North America and this year’s lineup of films is without question the best the Tour has ever presented. From Bolivia to the Seychelles, British Columbia and Patagonia, from Saskatchewan to Zambia and Virginia to Montana, the notable characters, unique storylines and unparalleled fishing in these films will lead you on an adventure around the globe! https://vimeo.com/150182088

As an added attraction, A local bluegrass band, Chain Station, will be playing starting at 6PM.  Come join the fun!

Costa Presents
2016 Fly Fishing Film Tour – Boulder, CO
Wed · March 30, 2016
Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm
Boulder Theater
Boulder, CO
Fly Shops – $15 Online $19
Discount tickets ($15) available at…Rocky Mountain Anglers & Front Range Anglers 

f3t2016 boulder2

Fishing Rocky Mountain National Park — BFC Chapter Meeting

 

Date: March 2
Time: 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Venue: Upslope Brewery Tasting Room
1898 S Flatiron Ct.
Boulder, CO 80302

Learn about fishing in RMNP from local guide/expert Kirk Bien of Kirk’s Flyshop located in Estes Park Colorado

kirks-big-t-fishKirk Bien has been fly fishing for 20 years, and guiding for 12 years. His favorite places to fly fish are Rocky Mountain National Park, specifically Forest Canyon and the Big Thompson River below Lake Estes. Kirk also guides backpacking and llama pack trips.

 

Rocky Mountain National Park is a protected area where fly fishing activities are balanced with efforts to restore and perpetuate natural aquatic environments and life. Populations of at least four species of trout exist in the park – brown, brook, rainbow, and cutthroat. RMNP, headwaters for the Colorado, Big Thompson, Cache la Poudre, and Fall Rivers, provides high country stream and lake fishing. Fishing opportunities in the RMNP range from high country catch and release fly fishing to big lake fishing to wintertime ice fishing. Kirks